Search Results: “chicago”

GE Works to Strengthen Local Chicago Communities

by Michele Evans.

GE is one of the largest industrial companies in the world. With a tremendous history going back 136 years, GE has developed thousands of patents and received two Nobel prizes. GE addresses some of the biggest problems facing society and searches for solutions in areas including energy, health, transportation and finance.

GE2The leadership of GE is also very involved in investing in Chicago and in response to that has partnered for more than 10 years with Special Olympics Illinois. GE has shared both financial resources and employee volunteer efforts to impact on quality of life for disadvantaged youth. Corporate support also works with Special Olympics Illinois to strengthen local Chicago communities.

Contributions from GE have helped support Chicago MedFest, which in partnership with Advocate Medical Group, provides free physicals to more than 1,200 Special Olympics athletes annually. This medical exam is the only physical many of the participating athletes receive. Support has also been invaluable in providing first aid medical kits used at Special Olympics Illinois sport competitions throughout the year.

But the relationship goes far beyond the generous financial support shared by GE. GE employees volunteer throughout the year at Special Olympics sport competitions. More than 150 employees volunteered at the Special Olympics Illinois Chicago/Area 3 Spring Games on May 9 and shared the enthusiasm and energy with hundreds of athletes they interacted with. GE employees participate on committees, support fundraising activities and advocate for Special Olympics Illinois throughout the year.

Special Olympics Illinois would not be the great organization it is without friends in the community … friends like GE.

Frank Olivo Competed at the First Special Olympics in Chicago

by Michele Evans.

Reposted with permission of BBC Witness

FrankOlivoIn the summer of 1968, the first Special Olympics was held at Soldier Field in Chicago. Special Olympics has since grown to become the largest sporting event for those with intellectual disabilities.

They are now held every two years in major cities around the world.

BBC Witness went back to Soldier Field to speak to Frank Olivo, a competitor at the first Special Olympics, and Anne Burke, an organizer. View segment

Witness is a World Service radio programme of the stories of our times told by the people who were there.

 

Clear Channel Chicago Selects SOILL As Partner for Clear Channel Communities

by Michele Evans.

Special Olympics Illinois to be Featured on 7 Stations During Month of September

CHICAGO, Ill.Clear Channel Media and Entertainment Chicago, one of the largest Chicago radio broadcasters with more than 5 million weekly radio listeners, has selected Special Olympics Illinois as one of the benefiting non-profit organizations included in the Clear Channel Communities initiative.

For the month of September,  Clear Channel Chicago will donate significant on air and digital airtime across its cluster of seven stations (107.5 WGCI-FM, 103.5 KISS FM, V103, Inspiration 1390AM, 95.5 El Patrón, 97.5 ESPN Deportes and 93.9 MYfm) to Special Olympics Illinois.

The Chicago Sky’s Elena Delle Donne, Chicago White Sox’s third baseman Conor Gillaspie, Chicago Fire’s Benji Joya and Blackhawk’s Brandon Saad have all lent their voices to public service announcements that urge listeners to realize the power of sports.

Special Olympics Illinois strives to deliver high-quality training and competition in an inclusive culture that stresses athletic excellence, rewards determination, emphasizes health and celebrates achievement. The organization currently serves about 10 percent of those eligible to participate and is always working to increase its reach.

Special Olympics Illinois is thrilled to have this opportunity to spread awareness for the nearly 21,500 traditional athletes with intellectual disabilities and more than 18,500 Young Athletes ages 2-7 with and without intellectual disabilities who participate in Special Olympics Illinois. Those interested in learning more about Special Olympics Illinois, or about getting involved, should visit www.soill.org.

 About Special Olympics Illinois

Special Olympics Illinois is a not-for-profit organization offering year-round training and competition in 19 sports for nearly 21,500 Traditional Athletes with intellectual disabilities and more than 18,500 Young Athletes ages 2-7 with and without intellectual disabilities. Special Olympics transforms the lives of people with intellectual disabilities, allowing them to realize their full potential in sports and in life. Special Olympics programs enhance physical, motor skills, self-confidence, social skills and encourage family and community support. If you are interested in learning more about Special Olympics Illinois, volunteering or providing financial support to help make Special Olympics programs possible, contact your local Special Olympics agency, call 800-394-0562 or visit our website at www.soill.org.

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Contact:

Alexandra McMillin, Special Olympics Illinois, at 630-942-5621

Chicagoland Residents, Law Enforcement Officials Participate in Plane Pull at O’Hare

by Michele Evans.

Participants Test ‘Tug-of-War’ Skills by Pulling 180,000-Pound Plane

CHICAGO, Ill. – Teams of local law enforcement agencies and the general public will participate in a larger than life tug-of-war challenge at 9 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 27. They will face off with a UPS Airbus A300 aircraft weighing more than 180,000 pounds at O’Hare International Airport, for the benefit of Special Olympics Illinois. The Law Enforcement Torch Run Plane Pull includes teams from law enforcement agencies, fire departments, private companies, high schools, colleges, fraternal groups and teams of friends and family. The opening ceremony is at 8:30 a.m.  A Plane Pull Team Schedule is available online for information on when teams are scheduled to compete.

“It’s great to see people supporting Special Olympics programs in Illinois and we’re excited to see them test their strength against a 90-ton airplane,” said Matt Johnson, Special Olympics Illinois Director of Special Events-Torch Run. “In addition to those participating in the Plane Pull, we encourage family and friends to join in the spirit by supporting their loved ones and Special Olympics programs by making a donation to Special Olympics Illinois by visiting www.illinoisplanepull.com.”

Registration is now open online at soill.donordrive.com.

Check-in begins at 7:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 27, at the Lynxs Cargo Area at O’Hare International Airport and team captains can turn in their donations and pick up their T-shirts and other materials.

Teams will be divided into three different divisions – Open Division is ideal for companies, school teams, church groups, clubs, friends and families, Public Safety Division is for law enforcement officers, firefighters, EMTs, DNR, DOC and military personnel and the brand new Hotel Division created by popular demand. Each team of 20 will attempt to pull the plane a distance of 12 feet, with the top finisher from each division facing off for one final pull to determine the Grand Champion team. To participate, each team is asked to raise a minimum of $1,000 ($50 per person) for Special Olympics Illinois. Teams raising more will be eligible for incentive prizes at the $2,500, $4,000 and $6,000 levels.

“On behalf of Mayor Rahm Emanuel and the Chicago Department of Aviation, I want to thank the Law Enforcement Torch Run committee and Special Olympics Illinois for holding this spectacular event at O’Hare International Airport for the fifth consecutive year,” said Chicago Department of Aviation Commissioner Rosemarie S. Andolino. “We are very proud to continue to support Special Olympics Illinois in its mission to provide year-round sports training and competition to children and adults with intellectual disabilities.”

UPS is Presenting Sponsor of the 2014 Law Enforcement Torch Run Plane Pull. Other sponsors are Chicago Department of Aviation, City of Chicago, HMS Host, Durham School Services, TD Ameritrade, Amplivox and Vacationland.  Because Special Olympics athletes compete free of charge, all money raised by the Plane Pull will directly assist in their training and competition. 

The Law Enforcement Torch Run is the single largest year-round fundraising vehicle benefiting Special Olympics Illinois. The annual intrastate relay and its various fundraising projects have two goals: to raise money and to gain awareness for the athletes who participate in Special Olympics Illinois. The Law Enforcement Torch Run has raised nearly $31 million over 28 years while increasing awareness of Special Olympics Illinois athletes and their accomplishments.

 

Special Olympics Illinois is a not-for-profit organization offering year-round training and competition in 19 sports for nearly 21,500 athletes with intellectual disabilities and more than 18,500 Young Athletes ages 2-7 with and without intellectual disabilities. Special Olympics changes lives by empowering people with intellectual disabilities to realize their full potential in sports and in life. Special Olympics programs enhance physical fitness, motor skills, self-confidence, social skills and encourage family and community support.  If you are interested in learning more about Special Olympics Illinois, volunteering or providing financial support to help make Special Olympics programs possible, contact your local Special Olympics agency, call 800-394-0562 or visit our website at www.soill.org.

Contacts:

Alexandra McMillin, Special Olympics Illinois, 630-942-5621
Michele Evans, Special Olympics Illinois, 309-660-8497
Gregg Cunningham, Chicago Department of Aviation, 773-686-3700
All media must RSVP in advance by contacting Gregg Cunningham

9th Annual Windy City Rubber Ducky Derby on Aug. 7 in Chicago

by Michele Evans.

CHICAGO – Special Olympics Illinois is gearing up for the 9th Annual Windy City Rubber Ducky Derby on Aug. 7. Join thousands of spectators watch 60,000 rubber ducks splash into the Chicago River from the Columbus Drive Bridge and race towards the finish line. Race Day kicks off at 10 a.m. at 400 N. Michigan Avenue (The Wrigley Building) with entertainment for the entire family – including the Radio Disney Chicago team and appearances by several sports mascots. Splashdown for the Duck Derby is at 1 p.m. Ducks will be sold at the event until 12:30 p.m.

The funds raised will help support year- round sports training and competition in 19 sports for nearly 21,500 Special Olympics athletes and more than 18,500 Young Athletes (ages 2-7) throughout Illinois

Adopt a duck for $5, a Quack Pack (6 ducks for $25) or a Flock of Ducks (24 ducks for $100) for your chance to win one of the Windy City Rubber Ducky Derby’s great prizes including a brand new 2014 Chevy Equinox or an all-inclusive Apple Vacation. Join the conversation on Race Day using #chiduckyderby.

Duck adoption sales teams are forming throughout the area and they compete for bragging rights and great prizes. To form a Sales Team, download a registration form at duckrace.com/Chicago. If groups or companies would like more information about getting involved, contact Corinne Zollars at czollars@soill.org or call 630-942-5610.

The Windy City Rubber Ducky Derby is presented by Jewel Osco. Thank you to TD Ameritrade, Amplivox, Beemsterboer, Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, Durham School Services, Dunkin Donuts, IlliniCare Health Plan, KIND, Chicagoland & Northwest Indiana Chevy Dealers,  Apple Vacations, Riu Palace Peninsula, Comcast Sportsnet, Chicagoland Speedway, Coca-Cola, The Shops of North Bridge, Nordstrom, Conrad Chicago Hotel, Eddie V’s, Seasons 52, Chipotle, Chicago Sun-Times, NBC 5 Chicago, Eataly, Radio Disney Chicago, RCN, 93.9 MY FM, The Wrigley Building, Shoreline Sightseeing, Chicago Water Taxi, Zeller Realty Group, Veolia Environmental Services, Wendella and The Village of Bridgeview for sponsoring the event.

About Special Olympics Illinois

Special Olympics Illinois is a not-for-profit organization offering year-round training and competition in 19 sports for nearly 21,500 Traditional Athletes with intellectual disabilities and more than 18,500 Young Athletes ages 2-7 with and without intellectual disabilities. Special Olympics transforms the lives of people with intellectual disabilities, allowing them to realize their full potential in sports and in life. Special Olympics programs enhance physical, motor skills, self-confidence, social skills and encourage family and community support. If you are interested in learning more about Special Olympics Illinois, volunteering or providing financial support to help make Special Olympics programs possible, contact your local Special Olympics agency, call 800-394-0562 or visit our website at www.soill.org.

Contact:

Alexandra McMillin, 630-942-5621