Gap Analysis Report


 

What is Accountability?

Merriam-Webster defines Accountability as “an obligation or willingness to accept responsibility.” Leadership Accountability defines how we make commitments to other team members, including our direct reports; how we measure and report our progress, whether it be through transparency about our status or our tendency to deflect blame; how we behave when things do go wrong, especially when our direct reports are involved; and how much ownership we take to get things done, at all levels and in collaboration with all team members.

If leaders within the organization aren’t accountable, then every effort toward performance improvement for both the leaders and their direct reports will be inefficient and ineffective. Our organization’s ability to execute and deliver results is directly tied to our leaders’ attitudes and perceptions about Accountability, both their own Accountability and the Accountability of those on their teams.

If you scored 24 or more points in the Leadership Dimension of Accountability and are within 7 points of your supervisor’s assessment . . .

 

. . . then you are on the right track and Accountability can be considered one of your strengths.

Great job!

You show qualities of Accountability through your actions and leadership style. You set clear, consistent expectations for your team and hold yourself to those same standards. Your behavior not only creates better morale within the team, but team members understand expectations and standards much better when their leader is accountable to them as well.

You understand that it is necessary to jump in and help your team when needed, and you take time to not only help with workload but support your team members in whatever way you can, making sure to reward and praise those who meet or exceed your expectations and challenging those who do not meet your expectations to improve in a timely fashion. You take responsibility not only for the work your team produces but for the development of your team as well.

If you received less than 24 points in the Leadership Dimension of Accountability or are more than 7 points away from your supervisor’s assessment . . .

. . . then you should focus more attention on Accountability and should consider it an opportunity for you.

Just taking this quiz shows you are on the right track to become an Accountable Leader! You might not be setting clear, consistent expectations for the team or holding yourself to those same standards; if you score differed more than seven (7) points from that of your supervisor’s assessment, there is a chance you are not holding yourself to the standard of Accountability that your supervisor expects at your level within the organization, and you may often feel like you are powerless to fix your team’s issues, that you see others outside your team as the ones to blame, or that you need your supervisor to tell you what to do.

Leaders who are not accountable can sometimes confuse team members; make them lose trust and confidence in their supervisor or the organization; and even lower overall morale by not setting clear standards and then holding everyone on the team accountable to them. If a leader is not accountable, she won’t know or be capable of directing work appropriately or jumping in to help the team when needed. Team members might not feel like they are receiving adequate support from leaders who are not accountable and will tend to distance themselves from the supervisor or organization in general.

Below are some action steps you can take to help you become an Accountable Leader: 
  • Take a Video Training, such as this great one at Lynda.com titled “Managing Teams.” –   If you would like to watch this video, please contact Gillian Bosquet at gbosquet@soill.org.
  • Take another Video Training, such as this one at Lynda.com titled “Motivating and Engaging Team members.” If you would like to watch this video, please contact Gillian Bosquet at gbosquet@soill.org.
  • Get Feedback:  Ask your team for anonymous feedback on how they think you’re doing as a leader; better yet, ask your supervisor to ask your team for this feedback, and make sure your team has the ability to do it anonymously. Leaders who are not accountable often do not have the full trust of their teams, so many team members may not feel comfortable giving you their true assessment directly. Never, under any circumstances, and in any way retaliate against a team member for giving you their opinion of your leadership. Retaliation is strictly prohibited at Special Olympics Illinois.
  • Create an Accountability Work Group:  One of the best ways to achieve Accountability is to develop shared Accountability among team members. Accountability within the team can be accomplished by what Morris R. Shechtman calls “Accountability groups,” groups which give team members the permission to speak and listen in a way which is frank and open. This Accountability group can include 2-5 people and can then serve as a small unit of people working together to confide in with struggles, weaknesses and insecurities. They can then find creative strategies to work together in the direction of the growth the team intends to achieve.
  • Create a Reward and recognition program with your team:  Team members need to know in a tangible way their efforts are indeed driving the company forward, and it is important for them to share in the fruits of their hard work. The offer of increased pay and benefits (vacations, time off and other perks) can keep Accountability and morale high and can motivate team members to continue to strive for high levels of performance.
  • Look for a mentor:  Find a mentor outside of the organization who leads differently than you do and who can challenge you in terms of your Accountability. Set up monthly or quarterly meetings with your mentor and create follow-up reports that you then share with your supervisor and your team.

 

What is Communication?

Merriam-Webster defined communication as a system for transmitting or exchanging information.

If you scored 24 or more points in the Leadership Dimension of Communication and are within 7 points of your supervisor’s assessment . . .

 

. . . then you are on the right track and Communication can be considered one of your strengths.

Great Job!

You have an excellent communication style that helps facilitate communication within your department. You ensure that all background information and details about your message are delivered, to help your team work effectively. As a leader, you are able to deliver difficult feedback while ensuring that your message is understood. You are proficient at actively listening to your team and this shows that you care about the content being communicated.

Continue to keep communication flowing within your department through transparency and consistency.

If you received less than 24 points in the Leadership Dimension of Communication or are more than 7 points away from your supervisor’s assessment . . .

 

. . . then you should focus more attention on Communication and should consider it an opportunity for you.

You need to develop a communication style that helps to facilitate the transmission of information within your department. You do not always convey all the background information and details that are needed to help your team work effectively. As a leader, you need to be able to deliver difficult feedback while ensuring that your message is understood. You need to work on your active listening skills to show your team that you care about the message being communicated.

Below are some action steps you can take to help you become a better Communicator: 
  • Take a Video Training, such as this great one at Lynda.com titled “Delivering Employee Feedback.” –  If you would like to watch this video, please contact Gillian Bosquet at gbosquet@soill.org.
  • Take another Video Training, such as this one at Lynda.com titled “Effective Listening.” If you would like to watch this video, please contact Gillian Bosquet at gbosquet@soill.org.

 

What is Conflict Resolution?

Conflict resolution is described as a way for two or more parties to find a peaceful solution to a disagreement among them. When a dispute arises, often the best course of action is negotiation to resolve the disagreement..

If you scored 24 or more points in the Leadership Dimension of Conflict Resolution and are within 7 points of your supervisor’s assessment . . .

 

. . . then you are on the right track and Conflict Resoltion can be considered one of your strengths.

Great Job!

You understand how to manage conflict resolution. You lead by example and show the team that working together is the expectation rather than the exception. You understand that it is crucial to address conflict when it happens, or as soon as possible. Good leaders like to help solve problems and should get involved when issues affect the workplace and work product.

Continue to be proactive in managing conflict within your team and with other departments.

If you received less than 24 points in the Leadership Dimension of Conflict Resolution or are more than 7 points away from your supervisor’s assessment . . .

 

. . . then you should focus more attention on Conflict Resolution and should consider it an opportunity for you.

Based on your analysis scores, conflict resolution is an area of opportunity for you. You lead by what you say, but not always with your actions. This could lead your team to see the exception as the rule. You do not address conflict immediately when it happens, but sometimes wait until it has escalated. Good leaders should like to help solve problems and you need to get more involved when issues affect the workplace and work product.

Below are some action steps you can take to help you become improve your Conflict Resolution skills: 
  • Take a Video Training, such as this great one at Lynda.com titled “Conflict Resolution Fundamentals.” –  If you would like to watch this video, please contact Gillian Bosquet at gbosquet@soill.org.
  • Take another Video Training, such as this one at Lynda.com titled “Having Difficult Conversations.” If you would like to watch this video, please contact Gillian Bosquet at gbosquet@soill.org.

 

What is Leadership?

A leader steps up in times of crisis, and is able to think and act creatively in difficult situations. Unlike management, leadership cannot be taught, although it may be learned and enhanced through coaching or mentoring.

If you scored 24 or more points in the Overall Dimension of Leadership and are within 7 points of your supervisor’s assessment . . .

 

. . . then you are on the right track and Leadership can be considered one of your strengths.

Great Job!

You demonstrate many qualities of a good leader. You have aligned yourself to the organizations greater objectives. You understand it is important to recognize your team and to back them on the decisions they make. As a leader, you are able to keep your team engaged and this allows them to grow in their position.

Continue leading your team in a positive and productive way and they will able to achieve great things.

If you received less than 24 points in the Overall Dimension of Leadership or are more than 7 points away from your supervisor’s assessment . . .

 

. . . then you should focus more attention on Leadership and should consider it an opportunity for you.

You need to work on your leadership skills in order to be an effective manager. You need to work on better aligning yourself to the organizations greater objectives. You need to back up your team on the decisions they make and give them responsibility for their projects. As a leader, you need to be aware of your team’s engagement

Below are some action steps you can take to help you become a better Leader: 
  • Take a Video Training, such as this great one at Lynda.com titled “Leadership Fundamentals.” –  If you would like to watch this video, please contact Gillian Bosquet at gbosquet@soill.org.
  • Take another Video Training, such as this one at Lynda.com titled “Managing for Results.” If you would like to watch this video, please contact Gillian Bosquet at gbosquet@soill.org.